Please Click All Our Links Below For A Healthy Enviroment And A Sound Home or Scroll Down This Home Page for Stucco, Mold, Radon, Asbestos, Meth Labs, Water Testing, Salmonella E coli Legionella and more.MOLD $195.00 Inspections Indoor Air Quality Testing Do Not Touch Anything Call Us at : 770 590-7880 Atlanta FloodsSTUCCO $295.00 Inspections Click Here EIFS Dryvit Synthetic Stucco Inspection is there hidden damage causing thousands of dollars of repairsRADON $295.00 Testing Click Here Radon kills Peter Jennings and Dana Reeves... Call us now for Radon Testing... 770 590-7880ASBESTOS $295.00 Testing Click Here Asbestos Time Bomb Article with Steve McQueens widow Asbestos Testing and Inspections Atlanta 770 590-7880WATER $195.00 Testing Salmonellosis Salmonella E coli Foodborne IllnessesMETHAMPHETAMINE Testing Click Here Residents of former methamphetamine labs sickened by fumes and residue left behind. Call us 770 590-7880 Methamphetamine Testing for Homes and BusinessessPHASE 1 Enviromental Site AssessmentATLANTA STUCCO REPAIR CONTRACTORS EIFS Dryvit EEFS Hard Coat Drivit Synthetic StuccoAREAS SERVICED in Florida, Georgia, and IllinoisHouston Mold Inspections Testing Indoor Air QualityATLANTA LIMOS AtlantaHotRodLimos.com Weddings Proms Receptions Parties Ball Games Concerts Funeral Limos Homecomings Parades Hot Rod Limousines

Atlanta Mold Inspections, Marietta Mold Testing, Acworth Stucco Inspections, Roswell Indoor Air Quality Testing, Alpharetta EIFS Inspector, Woodstock Dryvit Inspection, also Chicago, Elgin, and more.

atlanta floods apartment flooding carrollton mold testing acworth austell ga flood waters carroll county eifs inspector test atlanta mold inspections marietta indoor air quality chicago black mold stachybotrys molds roswell aspergillus penicillium calhoun mold remediation orlando iaq douglasville mold inspection smyrna flooding paulding county flood inspector dallas floods hiram home foreclosure mold report cobb county georgia water lithia springs mold inspector douglas county floodwater alpharetta basement flooded cartersville house flood fulton county floods house flooding atlanta wet drywall mold contamination georgia mold inspector ga black mold toxic foreclose mold vinings flood villa rica floods lawrenceville flooding hall county mold dawson county air quality gwinnett county homes flooded mold lab industrial hygienist cobb disaster recovery american red cross flood mold removal basement flooding mold remediation damage synthetic stucco moisture free warranty cleanup synthetic stucco inspections aol google youtube craigslist yahoo facebook myspace ebay bing search engines methamphetamine seizure inspection retesting emsl samples stucco home inspections foreclosed home inspections      

All Stucco & Mold Inspections, Inc. 
WE COME TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE

INDEPENDANT THIRD PARTY INSPECTIONS
ATLANTA FLOODING INSPECTIONS 
Indoor Air Quality Mold Testing
 FORECLOSED HOMES WITH TOXIC MOLD
TEST RESULTS IN 24 HOURS!!!
Be sure your house is safe to live in.
770 590-7880
We test for all forms of Mold!!!
www.allstucco.com    www.1800moldlab.com
EIFS Dryvit Synthetic Stucco Inspector
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Click here for Chicagoland area stucco and mold inspections.

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Debit cards, cash, Visa - Master Card - American Express - Discover 

Atlanta mold inspections indoor air quality mold testing Acworth stucco inspections Chicago IL eifs inspection Alpharetta Dryvit inspector Cartersville radon testing Elgin asbestos testing Fulton County methamphetamine lab home test Chicago meth residue asbestos Atlanta radon gas South Elgin stachybotrys mold Marietta Georgia eefs inspections Cobb County sick house syndrome drivit home inspector synthetic acworth stucco home inspection stucco building inspection atlanta drivit inspector cartersville mold testing marietta eefs inspection member better business bureau atlanta radon test kits kennesaw asbestos test alpharetta eifs Atlanta legionella Buckhead fulton county salmonellosis cobb county E coli marietta water testing canton food borne illnesses

Mold Inspections $195.00Stucco Inspections $295.00
Mold Testing $295.00

(2-Microbiology Tests with results in 24hrs. FREE UPGRADE)


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Atlanta GA  Chicago IL  Orlando FL   Mold Testing
 770 590-7880    847 989-0211     407 314-2975
Now open in Houston TX 713 360-8255

Click here to visit Houston Texas Location.


MOLD INSPECTIONS - MOLD TESTING - STUCCO INSPECTION - EIFS INSPECTIONS - RADON TESTING - ASBESTOS TESTING - METHAMPHETAMINE LAB ASSESSMENT - WATER TESTING - E COLI - COLIFORM - LEGIONELLA - DRYVIT INSPECTIONS DRIVIT
PHASE 1 and 2 ENVIRONMENTAL SITE INSPECTIONS

STUCCO CUSTOMERS PLEASE READ THIS!!!
DO NOT HIRE A STUCCO REPAIR COMPANY FOR STUCCO INSPECTIONS!

The American Society of Home Inspectors-the nations largest, oldest, and most respected Society of Home Inspectors requires that all members do not perform repairs on homes they inspect. This is because it is a conflict of interest and there is the potential for the client or home buyer to get taken advantage of if the inspector / repair contractor is unethical. These companies will have an average repair bill ready of between $4,000.00 and $7,000.00 even if you do not need repairs.
BEWARE ATLANTA HOMEOWNERS!!!

BIG CONFLICT OF INTEREST COSTING YOU THOUSAND$ HIRING THEM!


WE ARE AN INDEPENDANT THIRD PARTY with no vested interest in repairs. We work for you doing stucco inspections and warranties not repair bills...
  Certified Stucco Dryvit & EIFS Inspections Moisture Free Warranty Stucco Protect EEFS Drivit
   Stucco Warranty - Stucco Bond - Stucco Certificate
 Dryvit Acrocrete Finestone Parex Pre-Mix Marbletite
                  Same Day and Next Day Service Available

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A+ Member Better Business Bureau

Don't Touch The Mold...Call Us at :
770 590-7880 or 847 989-0211
MOLD INSPECTIONS $195.00

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"With over 12,000 inspections completed."

The worst thing to do is disturb the mold or try to clean it with bleach it does not work! Call us 770 590-7880

Atlanta Georgia Orlando Florida Foreclosed Homes Found With Toxic Mold In The Air
Many homes have tested high with elevated Aspergillus Penicillium and Stachybotrys mold as they stay closed up for weeks, months, and years. Humidity levels rise from no air circulation which is perfect for mold to grow in the air and families move in and come down with extreme illnesses.
BE SURE TO DO INDOOR AIR QUALITY TESTING ON ANY HOME PURCHASE YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN COVERED UP THAT CAN HARM YOU.

Georgia Homes for Sale helps individuals find Georgia Real Estate, including Atlanta GA Homes For Sale, condos, multi families, and townhouses for sale. Real estate agents have local expertise and experience, and will treat your concerns as their own. Georgia State Homes also services Rhode Island Homes For Sale and Connecticut Homes For Sale.



Please ask about our package inspection deals and discounts for :
Stucco Inspections
Indoor Air Quality Inspection
Mold Testing
Water Testing
E Coli Coliform
Radon Testing
Asbestos Testing
Methamphetamine Assessments
When you purchase a home be sure to have a Indoor Air Quality Test, Radon Test, and Water Test these are the most important inspections to do for your families health make sure your not buying a sick house and spending thousands to repair the home and the damage done to your families health. It can be prevented !!!
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We use the latest state of the art equipment in your home or business and the best analytical laboratory money can buy to be sure the job
is done right.

Atlanta EIFS Inspections Chicago Dryvit Synthetic Stucco Inspector
Florida Indoor Air Quality Testing Elgin Stucco Protect Policy Rockford
Inspector Marietta Methamphetamine Lab Assessments Inspections
Radon Testing Alpharetta Asbestos Testing Smyrna Duluth Johns Creek
Phase 1 Enviromental Site Assessment Georgia Florida Illinois Marengo
Acworth send us your mold samples for analytical testing & reporting

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Click here for Chicagoland stucco and mold inspections.

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Scott Zaeske 

Owner
President
All Stucco and Mold Inspections, Inc.
770 590-7880
23 Years Experience
Certified Moisture Free Stucco Home Inspector
"I inspect every home myself in Atlanta so you will not get someone unqualified to inspect your lifetime investment." "Many regular home inspectors should not be doing mold inspections, stucco inspection, radon testing, or meth labs."
"We use the newest state of the art equipment to do indoor air quality testing, mold inspections, radon testing, asbestos testing, and methamphetamine detection on surfaces."
"We have completed over 12,000 inspections with over 200,000 web site hits helping people all across the nation."

Excellence In Inspections Award Winner for the 10th straight year All Stucco and Mold Inspections Inc. Atlanta GA Chicago IL Orlando FL
"Call us now we can service your needs today."
770 590-7880 Atlanta 847 989-0211 Chicago 407 314-2975 Orlando

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Is it worth $295.00 to have the stucco system checked before you buy ??? These people thought that the inspection cost too much and did not have it done, until now. $50,000 later...

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Call us today we service Atlanta and all suburbs 770 590-7880

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Chicago and all suburbs 847 989-0211
and
Orlando Florida 407 314-2975

  • Certified Stucco - EIFS - Dryvit - Hard Coat - Synthetic Stucco Inspector
  • Certified Mold Inspections - Indoor Air Quality - IAQ Mold Testing
  • Certified Radon Testing Inspector
  • Certified Asbestos Testing Inspector
  • Certified Water Testing - E Coli - Coliform - Legionella Inspector
  • Certified Phase 1 and 2 Environmental Inspections
  • Certified Methamphetamine Detection
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Orlando Winter Park Tampa St Petersburg Florida
with over 23 years expertise call 407 314-2975 
Mold Inspections - Indoor Air Quality Testing - Sick House Syndrome - Hard Coat Stucco - Acrocrete - Premix Marbletite

Tampa St. Petersburg EIFS Inspection Orlando
Clearwater Florida Synthetic Stucco
407 314-2975
Stucco Inspections & Mold Testing
Synthetic stucco eifs home inspector
Pinellas County FL Hillsborough County FL
Elgin Illinois indoor air quality 847 989-0211
Marietta GA synthetic stucco 770 590-7880
Hard coat stucco inspection Chicago
Rockford IL black toxic mold inspector
Acworth Georgia stachybotrys inspection
Crystal Methamphetamine Lab Seizure Assessment Service
Asbestos Testing St. Charles Radon Testing
Cook County EIFS Kane County Dryvit Inspection
847 989-0211 and 770 590-7880
Synthetic stucco Drivit EIFS Dryvit Acrocrete
we are your residence expert on stucco
Cobb County Fulton County Cherokee County

Stucco Inspections $295.00
(Georgia Customers Only)



Proudly American Owned and Operated
 
This site is dedicated to the memory of my loving father Charles Zaeske and all WWII veterans. I will not forget what you have done for all of us free Americans and all our troops around the world God bless and keep you safe.

Scroll Down The Page For Stucco Inspections, Indoor Air Quality and Mold, Radon Testing, Asbestos Testing, and Methamphetamine Testing.

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We use the latest state of the art equipment to test the stucco system Tramex Wet Wall Detectors and Delmhorst probes. 

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Welcome,
My name is Scott Zaeske President of All Stucco and Mold Inspections Inc. of Atlanta Georgia, Chicago Illinois and Florida with over 23 years experience in synthetic stucco, EIFS, mold inspections, radon testing, asbestos testing, and methamphetamine seizure inspections.
Did you know that the EIFS or Dryvit type siding system
is extremely energy efficient with the foam insulation
in the wall but we will make sure it was done correctly. 
847 989-0211 Chicago, 407 314-2975 Florida, and 770 590-7880 Atlanta.

 Stucco Inspections $295.00 (GA Customers Only)

Please note if you are not available to be at the home during the inspection that is alright as we do the stucco inspection from the outside and do not need to get in the home.

At All Stucco and Mold Inspections Inc. our name preceeds us in quality, honest, timely, and courteous service as we are dedicated to you our customer.

Our mission at All Stucco Inspections Inc. is working for you as a independent third party stucco or EIFS home inspection company.

We have no vested interest in repairs but we can give you a list of contractors if needed and we will protect you from companies doing stucco inspections and repairs. If you do not hire us be sure you hire a company like us as an independent thrd party we will save you money.

Do not hire a stucco repair company to do your stucco inspection !!!

We can save you money and answer your questions about stucco, eifs, synthetic stucco,hardcoat, water damage, termite infestation, elastomeric coatings, Dow Corning caulking, moisture free warranty, and stucco bond.

Many home inspection companies are new to stucco or eifs which could hurt in the sale of a home or cost homeowners a lot of money in repair costs.
We have inspected over 12,000 stucco homes in the city of Atlanta and Chicago.

Our experience in eifs and stucco home inspections, chemistry, litigation, manufacturing, technical specifications, research, and development in this industry is unsurpassed.

Stucco homeowners or buyers rest assured that if these products are installed and maintained properly they will last as long if not longer than brick, wood, vinyl, or any siding system.

All Stucco Inspections Inc. does the following:

*Full moisture testing and inspection.
*Photographs of any needed upgrades.
*Written report documenting observations.
*Stucco report is ready the very same day as inspection.
*List of independant certified contractors.
*Stucco certificate and warranty.
Compare our services to any other stucco inspection company in Atlanta or Chicago or Florida and find out that All Stucco Inspections does the most for your dollar and no other company has as much experience as we do.

We also inspect commercial buildings including shopping centers, malls, hotels, motels, hospitals, industrial buildings, and high rises.


We bring peace of mind to our clients in offering services no other Atlanta, Chicago, or Florida stucco home inspection company can offer.

Synthetic Stucco www.allstucco.com

The History of Synthetic Stucco

Synthetic Stucco, also known as EIFS (Exterior Insulated Finish System), was first used in Europe after the end of World War II. The product was first installed on commercial buildings in Germany.

Synthetic stucco eventually made its way over to the United States. As in Europe, the early installations were on commercial properties. In the 1980’s, architects and builders began experimenting with the idea of using synthetic stucco on residential homes.

What is Synthetic Stucco?

Synthetic stucco installation begins with attaching 2’ X 4’ EPS foam panels to the plywood sheathing of the structure. A fiberglass mesh is attached to the foam. The stucco, which is an acrylic, rubber based product, is applied in one or two coats, and the final product is typically 1/16th to 1/8th inch thick. In comparison, hardcoat stucco installed over wood strips, known as lath, or over metal lath, does not have the foam underlayment, and is usually 3/4" to 1 inch thick.

Why Was Synthetic Stucco Used?

The product was touted as the "Exterior Cladding of the Future". Benefits included the ease and low cost to install. The EPS foam installed behind the stucco provided additional insulation benefits. The finish color is consistent throughout the stucco, making it, in theory, low maintenance. Architects favored the product because you could create interesting design features and details, adding to the curb appeal of homes with synthetic stucco cladding.

What are the problems with EIFS?

Synthetic stucco was meant to be a barrier system, meaning it was not intended for water to get behind the stucco. Once water got behind the stucco, the water was trapped, causing wood rot to the wood framing and sheathing of the home, as well as mold and mildew.

In the early 1990’s, problems were discovered on homes with EIFS located in Wilmington, North Carolina. Removal of the stucco revealed extensive structural damage to the homes as a result of moisture intrusion behind the stucco. Local building officials called in the builders, architects, and stucco manufacturers to evaluate the problem.

The examination of the home revealed moisture was intruding behind the stucco cladding, as a result of poor design and installation. Installation defects include failure to install proper window, door, and kick-out flashings, and leaking windows. In addition to the moisture related problems, it was discovered that the foam behind the stucco, when installed at or below grade, was conductive to termite and fire ant infestation.

As a result of problems discovered with synthetic stucco clad homes, inspection and testing protocols were created.

The Synthetic Stucco Inspection $295.00 (GA Customers Only)

A moisture intrusion inspection on a home with synthetic stucco is a combination of a visual inspection, and moisture detection using moisture meters designed specifically for this purpose.

The visual inspection accesses the installation of the stucco. The inspector verifies whether flashings are properly installed. The stucco is checked for any signs of damage, cracking, and delaminating. The inspector will determine if the stucco system terminates above or below grade. The windows and doors, porches and decks, and utility penetrations are carefully examined.

The home is then scanned for moisture using a non-invasive meter, typically a Tramex Wet Wall Scanner. This type of meter will scan up to 3 inches behind the stucco for any signs of moisture. The drawback to this type of meter is that false positives may occur as a result of metal installed behind the stucco, such as metal studs, electrical wiring, and plumbing piping. Inspection protocols require that specific areas be tested using a probe meter. With permission from the homeowner, two holes are drilled in each probe location. The probe meter will provide readings of the actual moisture content of the sheathing behind the stucco. Moisture readings below 14% are considered low, between 14 and 18% medium, and readings above 18% high. Moisture levels above 25% for an extended period are conducive to rot to the wood framing and sheathing, as well as mold and mildew.

All readings are recorded, and digital color photos are taken to document the condition of the system, including components installed correctly and incorrectly. A computer report is compiled from this data.


Why is it important that my stucco inspector not do any repair work?

  • If your inspector offers to make any repairs on his findings how can you be sure the findings are honest?
  • If you hire the inspector to perform the repair work, who can you hire to review the repair work and make sure that everything was repaired and repaired properly?
  • The American Society of Home Inspectors-the nations largest, oldest, and most respected Society of Home Inspectors requires that all members do not perform repairs on homes they inspect.  This is because it is a conflict of interest and there is the potential for the client or home buyer to get taken advantage of if the inspector / repair contractor is unethical.

If you interested in obtaining a Stucco Warranty, All Stucco and Mold Inspections follows the inspection protocol of the nation’s largest stucco insurer and our reports are accepted for review and possible warranty coverage.  With this solution you can feel safe that your warranty company will not disappear, you can feel secure that your interim and post repair inspections will be through and honest.  Warranties are written by Moisture Warranty Corporation.

 


EIFS means Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems
you will see EFIS, EEFS, IFIS, or FEIS.


Hardcoat stucco means cement, lime, and sand
you will see stuco, stuko, stucko, or stucc-o.


Please note:Testing equipment is 50% of the stucco inspection the other 50% is our experience.


Can you trust your lifetime investment with novice home inspectors or repair companies?

Chicago residents dial 847 989-0211


We have inspected all stucco and eifs products:

Dryvit Drivit Thorowall Finestone Sto Stow Stowe Senergy Acrocrete Premix Marbletite Parex Shield Industries Shields SIR Stucco Bonsal Fuller Eurocoat
Best Colormatch Color Guard Masterwall Moisture Free Warranty Servox R Wall USG Celotex Quick R Stucco Sir
Densglass Gold Durock Drivet Pro Stucco Drivett Drivette Dryvet Dryvette Termite Inspectors Termite Bond Termite cutting of stucco
and many more...

Orlando Tampa Clearwater Florida residents dial 407 314-2975

"We know stucco..."


We are also certified to do mold inspections of black mold, stachybotrys mold, and toxic mold along with indoor air quality and sick house syndrome testing. www.1800moldlab.com We also are certified radon, asbestos, and methamphetamine lab inspectors please read all below. 

Atlanta residents dial 770 590-7880

Synthetic Stucco Specification click here

EIFS Dryvit Synthetic Stucco Inspections

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Hard Coat European Cement Based Stucco Inspections

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Barrier System EIFS Dryvit Synthetic Stucco
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Drainable EIFS System Dryvit Synthetic Stucco System
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Hard Coat Cement Stucco System Pre-Mix Marbletite

"With over 12,000 stucco inspections completed."

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We perform certified Moisture Free Stucco Inspections.770 590-7880    $295.00




Atlanta Stucco Repair Contractor Listing
 
Quality Home Improvements - Mr. Ross Jurca
www.qualitystuccorepairs.com (404) 259-4565 

Craftmaster Enterprises - Mr. Shay Ricketts 
www.craftmasterenterprises.com  (678) 445-7966
                                                          (770) 480-5764

Quality Synthetic Stucco - Mr. Tim Sims
                                            (770) 974-0276

All Residential and Commercial Stucco Inspections
call :
All Stucco Inspections Inc.
Atlanta 770 590-7880
Chicago 847 989-0211  
 
www.allstucco.com  

FAQ about EIFS Inspections & Hard Coat Inspection

Non-intrusive moisture scanning equipment we use.
What type of moisture meters do you use?
Here are intrusive moisture probes used.
Can you show me the probes used?
Dow Corning silicone caulking for EIFS and hardcoat stucco.
What type of caulk do I use for my stucco home?
Stucco information and help from All Stucco Inspections.
Can you show me more information on stucco?
Elastomeric paint for stucco homes.
Can I paint a stucco home? Yes
What is EIFS, Dryvit, or synthetic stucco?.
Is a synthetic stucco home a energy saving system? Yes
Atlanta Better Businessmens Association.
Do you have other contacts for home improvement?
Drainable EIFS Synthetic Stucco specification.
Are there new stucco systems to release moisture?
Termite protection for stucco homes.
Call Any Pest 678 888-0035
Click here for Indoor Air Quality IAQ Inspections or Mold Inspections.
Do you also do indoor air quality inspections? Yes
Hardcoat stucco installations and inspections.
What is a hard coat stucco system?
My little sisters wedding music site in Houston TX.
Who is the most talented person in your family?

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Mold Inspections
$195.00
Indoor Air Quality
Mold Testing
$295.00
(Georgia Customers Only)
Sick House Syndrome

Latest News - Reports linking Alzheimer's Disease to Mold Contamination, Indoor Air Quality, Toxic Mold, Black Mold, and Sick House Syndrome!!! 

Mail us your mold samples for analytical testing with 24 hour turn around!!!
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Andrea's Mold Story (Please read it all.)
In May of 2000 our family of 10 moved from a small house in suburban Chicago to a 3 year-old 5500 square foot home in Monument Colorado. We chose Colorado for its beauty and proximity to my husband’s writing colleagues. A year later our 9th child was born. During the course of that first year I noticed a small brown spot on our eldest daughter’s carpet. At the time I thought nothing of it. Today I know it was our first indicator that toxic mold was present in our home.
As the years progressed we saw numerous medical issues arise. Our oldest daughter developed a severe allergy to nuts, another daughter was diagnosed with a seizure disorder, and a son developed a mild hearing loss. Other medical issues among the children included swollen adenoids, numerous skin rashes, excessive menstrual bleeding, and chronic strep throat.
Our dog was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 2 birds died.
In May of 2007 I pulled up the carpet where the brown spot had become quite large. We discovered black mold and immediately with the help of a friend tried to find the root of it by cutting into the drywall. We found extensive black mold surrounding the shower of the adjacent bathroom. Knowing nothing about black mold we called a remediation company.
They did not ventilate the air, wore no masks, and did not contain the affected rooms. They assured us there was no danger or risk to our family. We believed them. The cause of the mold was builder negligence. He stapled the shower pan liner instead of gluing it and improperly installed the shower drain.
7 weeks after this massive exposure our 7 year-old son was diagnosed with Type 1 juvenile diabetes.
In September our 11 year-old son complained of severe ringing in his ears. November 1st he was up all night with vomiting and severe vertigo.
School became an impossibility and in fact he never returned to 6th grade.After pursuing second and third opinions he was diagnosed with Meniere’s Disease. Several surgeries were performed before Christmas including a shunt and 2 gentamiacin injections all with the hope of eliminating the vertigo.
For a solid month I carried him around the house because walking had become so difficult. His walking improved with rehab and time but his chronic dizziness worsened. Our neurotologist became frustrated and told me our son needed tough love.
In February of 2008 my 10 year-old daughter was diagnosed with convergence insufficiency and diplopia after complaining of frequent headaches, dizziness, and motion sickness.
In March of 2008 the rashes my 6 year-old son had developed became extensive. He also was urinating frequently and was constipated. Our son with diabetes developed numbness in his hand, vision disburbances, headaches and severe abdominal pain. Our older son’s acne increased dramatically and he continued to struggle with chronic colds and sore throat.My husband’s right hand became numb. I was sufferering from chronic fatigue. I called an environmental hygienist and asked if mold could cause mysterious illnesses such as ours and he assured me that respiratory symptoms were the only manifestation of mold and advised us against air testing. Three of the children were now out of school completely.
In May of 2008 our 8 year-old noticed discoloration on the ceiling of his bedroom.
We discovered more mold. This now involved the master bedroom shower 3 floors above the previous mold. We called our mold remediation company and they began work immediately. Again they did not ventilate the air nor did they contain the affected rooms. We decided to have our air tested and on May 22nd learned that our spore counts for stachybotrys were greater than 200,000 in 2 of our rooms and more than 60,000 for chaetomium .
Having already asked the remediation company to remove their equipment we hired a new company to perform an emergency remediation. They contained the rooms, wore protective clothing and masks and ventilated the rooms properly. We disposed of all our bedding,linens, and clothing in the master bedroom , disinfected our air ducts and had all carpets steam cleaned.
In June of 2008 our spore count for black toxic mold was zero.
During the course of the summer we developed a major de-toxifying regimen. This included numerous supplements and major dietary changes. We continued to see the benefit of chiropractic treatment by an orthospinologist , a specialty involving the atlas bone and its intersection with the spinal column.
When there is misalignment the brain is inhibited from sending its messages to the body. Neurological and immune system issues result. One of the primary causes of misalignment is toxic exposure.
Our children all started school August 14th. Some symptoms remain. But I can take them to the park or swimming. They can play on sports teams and take dance lessons.
The laughter and tears of everyday life have returned to our home and for that I am grateful.
As I look back I wonder why we didn’t see our illnesses as more than coincidental. I wonder why no doctor or specialist looked at the whole picture of our family and asked what might be going on in our home environment. I wonder why the truth about this devasting health hazard is virtually unknown. Call us today : 847 989-0211 in Chicago or 770 590-7880 in Atlanta.
Mold Inspections $195.00
(Georgia Customers Only)
 

Below is a man with mold rash very common symptom especially in children and adults with weakened amune systems and it only gets worse.

Call us today at 770 590-7880 we are here to help you.

Mail us your home test kits for microbiology testing and report.

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Burning eyes red and watery

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Headaches and chronic sinus problems

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Asthma, Chronic Bronchitis Lung & Breathing Problems from mold

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Skin rashes open sores

Mold rash is very very common with mold present.

Indoor Air Quality and Mold Testing 
770 590-7880 or 847 989-0211

Complete indoor air quality with microbiology testing available checking for over twenty different forms of mold and allergens. Asbestos testing, radon testing, and methamphetamine seizure inspections with full lab testing.

If you do not hire our company be sure you hire a company like ours as we are an independant third party inspection service.

What this means is you are not at the mercy of a company doing an inspection and then they have a huge repair bill.

We have no vested interest in repairs or clean up but we will recommend companies if needed to do any cleaning.

Why is mold growing in my home?

Molds are part of the natural environment. Outdoors, molds play a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as fallen leaves and dead trees, but indoors, mold growth should be avoided. Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores; the spores are invisible to the naked eye and float through outdoor and indoor air. Mold may begin growing indoors when mold spores land on surfaces that are wet. There are many types of mold, and none of them will grow without water or moisture.

Can mold cause health problems?

Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins). Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.

Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common. They can be immediate or delayed. Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people.

Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold. Research on mold and health effects is ongoing. Inspecting, assessing, and testing for mold is a must.

How do I get rid of mold?

It is impossible to get rid of all mold and mold spores indoors; some mold spores will be found floating through the air and in house dust. The mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present. Indoor mold growth can and should be prevented or controlled by controlling moisture indoors.

If there is mold growth in your home call a mold expert to inspect and test as soon as possible. If you clean up the mold, but don't fix the water problem, then, most likely, the mold problem will come back.

We believe that our families health is the most important thing and we will bring our 20 years expertise to your home.

We handle all commercial building and residential home mold inspections, toxic mold, and black mold sampling. Moisture detection, flood specialists, and termite detection analysis.
IAQ indoor air quality experts 770 590-7880 Atlanta and 847 989-0211 Chicago.
Mold Inspections $195.00
(Georgia Customers Only)

Atlanta Methamphetamine Testing
Chicago Meth Inspector
Acworth Industrial Hygienist
Elgin Building Inspection Service
Kennesaw Home Inspection Service
Woodstock Mold and Mildew Services
and
Atlanta Stucco Exterior Coating Inspections

770 590-7880
Chicago EIFS & Indoor Air Quality
847 989-0211
Florida Dryvit Inspector

Mail us your mold samples for microbiology testing.

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Radon - Radon is a cancer-causing natural radioactive gas that you can’t see, smell or taste.  Its presence in your home can pose a danger to your family's health.  Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers.  Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in America and claims about 20,000 lives annually.
Radon Testing $195.00
(Georgia Customers Only)

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Peter Jennings death and Dana Reeves death linked to Radon Gas in their homes. Radon is a cancer-causing natural radioactive gas that you can’t see, smell or taste. Its presence in your home can pose a danger to your family's health. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in America and claims about 20,000 lives annually. Learn how you can protect your family. Test Your Home for Radon — it's easy and inexpensive. 770 590-7880

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Latest News - Reports linking Alzheimer's Disease to Mold Contamination, Indoor Air Quality, Toxic Mold, Black Mold, and Sick House Syndrome!!! 

Atlanta 770 590-7880
Chicago 847 989-0211

Is Radon killing you? Radon Testing $195.00 
                                        
(Georgia Customers Only)
Liz Hoffman Providing A Voice To Stop the Nation's 2nd Leading Cause of Lung Cancer

One in five people diagnosed with lung cancer have never smoked.

Prevention for your family starts with a simple test of your home.

My name is Elizabeth Hoffmann and I’m a survivor of radon induced lung cancer. Although, I have never smoked, my 15-year exposure to dangerous levels of radon in my home resulted in doctors having to remove the cancerous lower lobe of my left lung prior to my 38th birthday.

Lucky for me, they caught my cancer early. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and EPA blame radon for the deaths of 21,000 Americans every year. But, their deaths, like my cancer, could have been prevented. A simple radon test at the time we bought our home in 1988 would have alerted me to fix our house before we moved in. If I’d only known...

Since few oncologists provide a potential explanation for the cause, most non-smokers diagnosed with lung cancer never make a connection to radon exposure. I would remain clueless myself, if it hadn’t been for the determination of my family to find out why. My cousin mentioned radon to my father, who tested my house upon my return from the hospital.

The purpose of this website is two-fold: First, to put a face on radon, empowering sufferers of an apparent radon-induced lung cancer (and their families) with a voice. While it is obviously too late to prevent our cancer, our stories can convince others to prevent deadly radon exposure by testing and fixing. We can also shape public policy by convincing lawmakers and government agencies to treat the radon issue and lung cancer with the seriousness they deserve.

Second, to prevent LC victims from remaining clueless. If you or a family member has been recently diagnosed with lung cancer, it is imperative that you test your home for radon.

If you determine radon is the likely cause of your lung cancer, we’ll simply invite you to come forward and share your story. Together, we can make a difference for generations to come.

Doctors Warn of the Need For Prevention

People come into my office and say Doc Price I just don’t understand it. How can this happen to me? I don’t smoke. Nobody ever smokes around me. How can I have lung cancer?

While it is true that most of my lung cancer patients have had a lot of tobacco exposure, the ones that are especially sad are the people who have never smoked, have never been around secondhand smoke, who have lived “good clean lives” and lo and behold, they have a cold or bronchitis, and the chest x-ray and the cat scan show they have lung cancer.

But, it is really hard to convince the public that radon is a problem when the nation’s leading housing authority, HUD, refuses to take action to prevent radon exposure. They require a termite letter to qualify for a mortgage, yet to my knowledge a termite never killed anybody. Why are they not requiring a radon test?

We know the direct association between radon and lung cancer. But to the people at risk, it’s a totally unperceivable problem because you can’t feel it; you don’t smell it and you don’t see it.

Lung cancer kills more Americans each year (160,000) than breast, prostate and colorectal cancers combined. The EPA estimates 21,000 of them are the result of radon-induced lung cancer. That’s nearly 60 per day!”

Never underestimate the importance of prevention in all aspects of your life. If you’re a lung cancer victim aware of all the ways it is impacting you and your family – you’d be kicking yourself if you knew something a simple as a radon detection device would have allowed you to prevent this from occurring.

Please contact us at All Stucco and Mold Inspections today 770 590-7880 and schedule a Radon test.

Where Does Radon Come From?

Radon is a naturally occurring odorless, tasteless, colorless radioactive gas. It is produced by the natural breakdown of radium in soil, rock and water. Many homes and other buildings, such as schools and offices have high levels of radon. Because it's odorless and invisible and the lung cancer usually shows up over a long period of exposure, the danger of radon is often underestimated.

Because of the stack effect, radon can be drawn into the home from the soil below. Common entry points are cracks in concrete floors, utility access points, spaces around floor drains, sump pits, construction joints and tiny cracks in basement walls. The concentration will depend on the source strength and the rate of pressure driven entry.

How Does Radon Induce Lung Cancer?

If inhaled, airborne radon decay products become deeply lodged or trapped in the lungs, where the alphas radiate and penetrate the cells of the mucous membranes, bronchi, and other pulmonary tissues.

The ionizing radiation energy affecting the bronchial epithelial cells is believed to initiate the process of the carcinogenesis. Although, radon-related lung cancers are mainly seen in the upper airways, radon increases the incidence of all histological types of lung cancer, including small cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

What is The Evidence?

More is known about the health risk of radon exposure than almost any other human carcinogen. In fact, the University of Iowa College of Public Health recently compiled a bibliography of radon epidemiology research that took 192 pages just to list!

These include extensive studies of thousands of underground miners, carried out over more than 50 years worldwide, that have consistently shown an increase in lung cancer occurrence with exposure to radon progeny.

Miner studies have produced some interesting findings. For example, at equal cumulative exposures, low exposures in the range of EPA’s 4 pCi/L Action Level over longer periods produced greater lung cancer risk that high exposures over short periods. Non-smoking miners were observed to have a significant increased risk, even after controlling for, or in the absence of other mine exposures such as asbestos, silica, diesel fumes, arsenic, chromium, nickel, and ore dust. An added synergic effect between radon exposure and cigarette smoking was also found.

The NAS has repeatedly concluded that it is reasonable to extrapolate from the miner data to a residential situation and in doing so, consider that the effective doses per unit of exposure for people in homes is approximately 30% less than for the miners.

Residential studies have yielded similar findings. The Iowa Residential Radon Study completed in May of 2000 determined that even at the EPA Action Level of 4 pCi/L, an approximate 50 percent excess lung cancer risk was found among the women in the study after correcting for the impact of smoking. A 2002 residential study conducted in northeast Spain yielded similar results. Even at concentrations far below official guideline levels, the Spanish study found that radon might lead to a 2.5-fold rise in the risk of lung cancer.

Exposures of animals further confirm that radon and its progeny cause lung cancer. Health effects observed in animals exposed to radon include lung carcinomas, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and a shortening of life span. The incidence of respiratory tract tumors increased with an increase in cumulative exposure. Exposure to ore dust and diesel fumes simultaneously with radon did not increase the incidence of lung tumors above that produced by radon progeny exposures alone. In a study of rats exposed to radon progeny, it was observed that the risk of lung cancer was elevated at exposure levels similar to those found in homes.

Can High Radon Levels Be Reduced?

A certified or licensed contractor can easily and affordably reduce elevated radon levels. Most techniques prevent radon from entering your home by drawing the radon from below the house and venting it through a pipe to the air above the house where it quickly dilutes.

Mitigation can also decrease moisture and other soil gases entering the home, reducing mold, mildew, methane, pesticide gases and other air quality problems.

Facts About Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Lung cancer kills more Americans each year than breast, prostate and colorectal cancers combined.

Lung cancer kills more women each year than breast cancer.

Lung cancer kills 85% of newly diagnosed patients within five years.

Approximately 50% of the people diagnosed with lung cancer have never smoked or are former smokers.

Lung cancer gets few of the research dollars because of the perception it is self-inflicted by smoking.

In 2003, approximately $1,740 was spent on research per lung cancer death, compared with: $13,649 per breast cancer death, $10,560 per prostate cancer death and $4,581 per colorectal cancer death.
Radon Testing $195.00
(Georgia Customers Only)


Exposure to Radon Causes Lung Cancer In Non-smokers and Smokers Alike

Lung cancer kills thousands of Americans every year.  The untimely deaths of Peter Jennings and Dana Reeve have raised public awareness about lung cancer, especially among people who have never smoked.  Smoking, radon, and secondhand smoke are the leading causes of lung cancer.  Although lung cancer can be treated, the survival rate is one of the lowest for those with cancer.  From the time of diagnosis, between 11 and 15 percent of those afflicted will live beyond five years, depending upon demographic factors.  In many cases lung cancer can be prevented; this is especially true for radon.

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METH LAB HOMES
Methamphetamine Inspections :
847 989-0211 in Chicago
770 590-7880 in Atlanta

Methamphetamine Testing of homes and businesses before you buy them. Is it worth it? 

A Methamphetamine Lab can be ANYWHERE,
Even a House Like This.
Methamphetamine Inspection & Testing - $500.00
                                                                             (GA Customers Only)
 

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Rhonda Holt and her son Ethan comforted 2-year-old Anna, who needed breathing treatment after the relapse of an illness that began in their meth-contaminated home.

WINCHESTER, Tenn. — The spacious home where the newly wed Rhonda and Jason Holt began their family in 2005 was plagued by mysterious illnesses. The Holts’ three babies were ghostlike and listless, with breathing problems that called for respirators, repeated trips to the emergency room and, for the middle child, Anna, the heaviest dose of steroids a toddler can take.

Ms. Holt, a nurse, developed migraines. She and her husband, a factory worker, had kidney ailments.

It was not until February, more than five years after they moved in, that the couple discovered the root of their troubles: their house, across the road from a cornfield in this town some 70 miles south of Nashville, was contaminated with high levels of methamphetamine left by the previous occupant, who had been dragged from the attic by the police.

The Holts’ next realization was almost as devastating: it was up to them to spend the $30,000 or more that cleanup would require.

With meth lab seizures on the rise nationally for the first time since 2003, similar cases are playing out in several states, drawing attention to the problem of meth contamination, which can permeate drywall, carpets, insulation and air ducts, causing respiratory ailments and other health problems.

Federal data on meth lab seizures suggest that there are tens of thousands of contaminated residences in the United States. The victims include low-income elderly people whose homes are surreptitiously used by relatives or in-laws to make meth, and landlords whose tenants leave them with a toxic mess.

Some states have tried to fix the problem by requiring cleanup and, at the time of sale, disclosure of the house’s history. But the high cost of cleaning — $5,000 to $100,000, depending on the size of the home, the stringency of the requirements and the degree of contamination — has left hundreds of properties vacant and quarantined, particularly in Western and Southern states afflicted with meth use.

“The meth lab home problem is only going to grow,” said Dawn Turner, who started a Web site, www.methlabhomes.com, after her son lost thousands of dollars when he bought a foreclosed home in Sweetwater, Tenn., that turned out to be contaminated. Because less is known about the history of foreclosed houses, Ms. Turner said, “as foreclosures rise, so will the number of new meth lab home owners.”

Meth contamination can bring financial ruin to families like that of Francisca Rodriguez. The family dog began having seizures nine days after the Rodriguezes moved into their home in Grapevine, Tex., near Dallas, and their 6-year-old son developed a breathing problem similar to asthma, said Ms. Rodriguez, 35, a stay-at-home mother of three.

After learning from neighbors that the three-bedroom ranch-style home had been a known “drug house,” the family had it tested. The air ducts had meth levels more than 100 times higher than the most commonly cited limit beyond which cleanup is typically required.

The former owner had marked “no” on a disclosure form asking whether the house had ever been a meth lab, Ms. Rodriguez said. But because he is now in prison for meth possession, among other things, the Rodriguezes decided there was nothing to gain by suing him. They moved out, throwing away most of their possessions because they could not be cleaned, and are letting the house go into foreclosure.

“It makes you crazy,” Ms. Rodriguez said. “Our credit is ruined, we won’t be able to buy another house, somebody exposed my kids to meth, and my dog died.”

Federal statistics show that the number of clandestine meth labs discovered in the United States rose by 14 percent last year, to 6,783, and has continued to increase, in part because of a crackdown on meth manufacturers in Mexico and in part because of the spread of a new, easier meth-making method known as “shake and bake.”

There are no national standards governing meth contamination. Congress ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to publish cleanup guidelines by the end of 2008, but the agency is still reviewing a draft version. Without standards, professional cleaners say, it is easy to bungle a job that often requires gutting and repeated washing.

About 20 states have passed laws requiring meth contamination cleanup, and they use widely varied standards. Virtually all the laws hold the property owner financially responsible; Colorado appears to be the only state that allots federal grant money to help innocent property owners faced with unexpected cleanup jobs.

In other states, like Georgia, landlords and other real estate owners have fought a proposed cleanup law.

After the Holts bought their house here, Tennessee passed such a law. But since 2005, only 81 of 303 homes placed under a resulting quarantine have been cleaned, according to the state, which has one of the few registries tracking meth lab addresses. The law applies only if the police find a working meth lab at the house, and Jerry Hood, a lawyer and cleanup contractor hired by the Holts for the decontamination work, said many houses in the county had escaped the legislation.

The health effects of meth contamination are frequently difficult to prove, and research is scant. But John W. Martyny, a meth expert at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, said living in a former meth lab made children more likely to develop learning disabilities and caused long-term respiratory and skin problems.

Even brief exposure can have severe effects, Dr. Martyny said. A 2007 study by the Denver center found that more than 70 percent of law enforcement officials who had inspected meth labs subsequently reported health problems.

To Ms. Holt’s horror, inspectors found high concentrations of meth on her kitchen countertops, where she sterilized bottles, prepared baby food and doled out snacks.

“We had no idea that we were starting a family in a meth house,” she said. “We bought a house that eventually was going to sentence our family to death.”

When the family left the house, moving in with Mr. Holt’s parents, their health problems largely subsided. The children no longer needed medication to breathe. The migraines and the kidney ailments vanished.

But the heartaches continued. Ms. Holt has been working two jobs to earn money to pay for her house’s remediation, which has proceeded in fits and starts with donations from church fund-raisers and local businesses. And Anna, 2, had a relapse and had to return briefly to the hospital.

“We don’t know what it’s going to be in the future,” Ms. Holt said, standing in the barren, unfinished structure that was once her dream home and reflecting on her children. “This meth contamination is all their immune systems have ever known.”

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Water Testing - $195.00
(Georgia Customers Only)

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DRINKING?

Suburban Water Testing Labs can tell you. A simple water test can restore your confidence in the safety of you and your family. More importantly, testing may reveal contaminants that you have unknowingly been living with for many years.

WHAT CAN CONTAMINATION CAUSE?
Some cause immediate illness, while others can create serious long-term health problems.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I HAVE CONTAMINATION?
If this is the case, our experts can advise you of the best way to solve the problems without the conflict of interest that comes with using a lab that sells water treatment equipment. When it comes to your drinking water, quality is not optional. Protect yourself and your family by testing your water at the point of use.

Why should I test my water?

Water contamination can have a negative affect on the health of you and your family. The effects may be immediate or long term. A USGS survey found that 70% of private wells were contaminated. EPA recommends that you test for a minimum of coliform bacteria, nitrate and lead, even if you have public water.

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Asbestos Testing & Inspection 
Asbestos Testing - $195.00
(Georgia Customers Only) 
407 314-2975 Orlando
847 989-0211 Chicago
770 590-7880 Atlanta

Is there asbestos in your home or office or factory?

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Asbestos Inspection and Testing 770 590-7880
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  1. What is asbestos?

    Asbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers and can be separated into thin, durable threads. These fibers are resistant to heat, fire, and chemicals and do not conduct electricity. For these reasons, asbestos has been widely used in many industries.

    There are two subgroups of asbestos: chrysotile, which has curly fibers and is in the serpentine family of minerals; and amphibole asbestos, which has straight, needle-like fibers and includes actinolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, and amosite asbestos. Chrysotile asbestos is the form that has been used predominantly in commercial applications worldwide (1, 2).

  2. How is asbestos used?

    Asbestos was mined and used commercially in North America beginning in the late 1800s. Its use increased greatly during World War II (3, 4). Since then, asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, the building and construction industry has used it for strengthening cement and plastics as well as for insulation, roofing, fireproofing, and sound absorption. The shipbuilding industry has used asbestos to insulate boilers, steampipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses asbestos in vehicle brakeshoes and clutch pads. Asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tile; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics. In addition, asbestos has been found in vermiculite-containing consumer garden products and some talc-containing crayons.

    In the late 1970s, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) banned the use of asbestos in wallboard patching compounds and gas fireplaces because the asbestos fibers in these products could be released into the environment during use. Additionally, in 1979, manufacturers of electric hairdryers voluntarily stopped using asbestos in their products. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned all new uses of asbestos; uses established prior to 1989 are still allowed. The EPA also established regulations that require school systems to inspect for damaged asbestos and to eliminate or reduce the exposure to occupants by removing the asbestos or encasing it (2).

    In June 2000, the CPSC concluded that the risk of children’s exposure to asbestos fibers in crayons was extremely low (1). However, the U.S. manufacturers of these crayons agreed to eliminate talc from their products. In August 2000, the EPA responded to reports it received about the adverse human health effects associated with exposure to asbestos-contaminated vermiculite by conducting a series of tests to evaluate the extent of the risk. The EPA investigation concluded that the potential exposure to asbestos from some vermiculite products poses only a minimal health risk to consumers. The EPA recommended that consumers reduce the low risk associated with the occasional use of vermiculite during gardening activities by limiting the amount of dust produced during use. Specifically, the EPA suggested that consumers use vermiculite outdoors or in a well-ventilated area; keep vermiculite damp while using it; avoid bringing dust from vermiculite use into the home on clothing; and use premixed potting soil, which is less likely to generate dust.

    The regulations described above and other actions, coupled with widespread public concern about the health hazards of asbestos, have resulted in a significant annual decline in U.S. use of asbestos. Domestic consumption of asbestos amounted to about 803,000 metric tons in 1973, but it had dropped to about 2,400 metric tons by 2005 (3, 5).

  3. What are the health hazards of exposure to asbestos?

    People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems (6).

    Asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2, 3, 7, 8). Studies have shown that exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (a relatively rare cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen). Although rare, mesothelioma is the most common form of cancer associated with asbestos exposure. In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, some studies have suggested an association between asbestos exposure and gastrointestinal and colorectal cancers, as well as an elevated risk for cancers of the throat, kidney, esophagus, and gallbladder (3, 4). However, the evidence is inconclusive.

    Asbestos exposure may also increase the risk of asbestosis (a chronic lung disease that can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and permanent lung damage) and other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, including pleural plaques (changes in the membrane surrounding the lung), pleural thickening, and pleural effusions (abnormal collections of fluid between the thin layers of tissue lining the lung and the wall of the chest cavity). Although pleural plaques are not precursors to lung cancer, evidence suggests that people with pleural disease caused by asbestos exposure may be at increased risk for lung cancer (9).

  4. Who is at risk for an asbestos-related disease?

    Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.

    Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos. Health hazards from asbestos fibers have been recognized in workers exposed in shipbuilding trades, asbestos mining and milling, manufacturing of asbestos textiles and other asbestos products, insulation work in the construction and building trades, and a variety of other trades. Demolition workers, drywall removers, asbestos removal workers, firefighters, and automobile workers also may be exposed to asbestos fibers. However, recent studies do not support an increased risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma among automobile mechanics exposed to asbestos through brake repair (10). As a result of Government regulations and improved work practices, today’s workers (those without previous exposure) are likely to face smaller risks than did those exposed in the past.

    Those involved in the rescue, recovery, and cleanup at the site of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City are another group at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Because asbestos was used in the construction of the North Tower of the WTC, when the building was attacked, hundreds of tons of asbestos were released into the atmosphere. Those at greatest risk include firefighters, police officers, paramedics, construction workers, and volunteers who worked in the rubble at Ground Zero. Others at risk include residents in close proximity to the WTC towers and those who attended schools nearby. These populations will need to be followed to determine the long-term health consequences of their exposure (11).

    One study found that nearly 70 percent of WTC rescue and recovery workers suffered new or worsened respiratory symptoms while performing work at the WTC site. The study describes the results of the WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, which was established to identify and characterize possible WTC-related health effects in responders. The study found that about 28 percent of those tested had abnormal lung function tests, and 61 percent of those without previous health problems developed respiratory symptoms (12). However, it is important to note that these symptoms may be related to exposure to debris components other than asbestos.

    Although it is clear that health risks from asbestos exposure increase with heavier exposure and longer exposure time, investigators have found asbestos-related diseases in individuals with only brief exposures. Generally, those who develop asbestos-related diseases show no signs of illness for a long time after their first exposure. It can take from 10 to 40 years or more for symptoms of an asbestos-related condition to appear (2).

    There is some evidence that family members of workers heavily exposed to asbestos face an increased risk of developing mesothelioma. This risk is thought to result from exposure to asbestos fibers brought into the home on the shoes, clothing, skin, and hair of workers. To decrease these exposures, Federal law regulates work practices to limit the possibility of asbestos being brought home in this way. Some employees may be required to shower and change their clothes before they leave work, store their street clothes in a separate area of the workplace, or wash their work clothes at home separately from other clothes (2).

    Cases of mesothelioma have also been seen in individuals without occupational exposure, but who live close to asbestos mines or have been exposed to fibers carried home by family members working with asbestos (6).

  5. Asbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers and can be separated into thin, durable threads. These fibers are resistant to heat, fire, and chemicals and do not conduct electricity. For these reasons, asbestos has been widely used in many industries.

    There are two subgroups of asbestos: chrysotile, which has curly fibers and is in the serpentine family of minerals; and amphibole asbestos, which has straight, needle-like fibers and includes actinolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, and amosite asbestos. Chrysotile asbestos is the form that has been used predominantly in commercial applications worldwide (1, 2).

  6. How is asbestos used?

    Asbestos was mined and used commercially in North America beginning in the late 1800s. Its use increased greatly during World War II (3, 4). Since then, asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, the building and construction industry has used it for strengthening cement and plastics as well as for insulation, roofing, fireproofing, and sound absorption. The shipbuilding industry has used asbestos to insulate boilers, steampipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses asbestos in vehicle brakeshoes and clutch pads. Asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tile; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics. In addition, asbestos has been found in vermiculite-containing consumer garden products and some talc-containing crayons.

    In the late 1970s, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) banned the use of asbestos in wallboard patching compounds and gas fireplaces because the asbestos fibers in these products could be released into the environment during use. Additionally, in 1979, manufacturers of electric hairdryers voluntarily stopped using asbestos in their products. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned all new uses of asbestos; uses established prior to 1989 are still allowed. The EPA also established regulations that require school systems to inspect for damaged asbestos and to eliminate or reduce the exposure to occupants by removing the asbestos or encasing it (2).

    In June 2000, the CPSC concluded that the risk of children’s exposure to asbestos fibers in crayons was extremely low (1). However, the U.S. manufacturers of these crayons agreed to eliminate talc from their products. In August 2000, the EPA responded to reports it received about the adverse human health effects associated with exposure to asbestos-contaminated vermiculite by conducting a series of tests to evaluate the extent of the risk. The EPA investigation concluded that the potential exposure to asbestos from some vermiculite products poses only a minimal health risk to consumers. The EPA recommended that consumers reduce the low risk associated with the occasional use of vermiculite during gardening activities by limiting the amount of dust produced during use. Specifically, the EPA suggested that consumers use vermiculite outdoors or in a well-ventilated area; keep vermiculite damp while using it; avoid bringing dust from vermiculite use into the home on clothing; and use premixed potting soil, which is less likely to generate dust.

    The regulations described above and other actions, coupled with widespread public concern about the health hazards of asbestos, have resulted in a significant annual decline in U.S. use of asbestos. Domestic consumption of asbestos amounted to about 803,000 metric tons in 1973, but it had dropped to about 2,400 metric tons by 2005 (3, 5).

  7. What are the health hazards of exposure to asbestos?

    People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems (6).

    Asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2, 3, 7, 8). Studies have shown that exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (a relatively rare cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen). Although rare, mesothelioma is the most common form of cancer associated with asbestos exposure. In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, some studies have suggested an association between asbestos exposure and gastrointestinal and colorectal cancers, as well as an elevated risk for cancers of the throat, kidney, esophagus, and gallbladder (3, 4). However, the evidence is inconclusive.

    Asbestos exposure may also increase the risk of asbestosis (a chronic lung disease that can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and permanent lung damage) and other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, including pleural plaques (changes in the membrane surrounding the lung), pleural thickening, and pleural effusions (abnormal collections of fluid between the thin layers of tissue lining the lung and the wall of the chest cavity). Although pleural plaques are not precursors to lung cancer, evidence suggests that people with pleural disease caused by asbestos exposure may be at increased risk for lung cancer (9).

  8. Who is at risk for an asbestos-related disease?

    Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.

    Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos. Health hazards from asbestos fibers have been recognized in workers exposed in shipbuilding trades, asbestos mining and milling, manufacturing of asbestos textiles and other asbestos products, insulation work in the construction and building trades, and a variety of other trades. Demolition workers, drywall removers, asbestos removal workers, firefighters, and automobile workers also may be exposed to asbestos fibers. However, recent studies do not support an increased risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma among automobile mechanics exposed to asbestos through brake repair (10). As a result of Government regulations and improved work practices, today’s workers (those without previous exposure) are likely to face smaller risks than did those exposed in the past.

    Those involved in the rescue, recovery, and cleanup at the site of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City are another group at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Because asbestos was used in the construction of the North Tower of the WTC, when the building was attacked, hundreds of tons of asbestos were released into the atmosphere. Those at greatest risk include firefighters, police officers, paramedics, construction workers, and volunteers who worked in the rubble at Ground Zero. Others at risk include residents in close proximity to the WTC towers and those who attended schools nearby. These populations will need to be followed to determine the long-term health consequences of their exposure (11).

    One study found that nearly 70 percent of WTC rescue and recovery workers suffered new or worsened respiratory symptoms while performing work at the WTC site. The study describes the results of the WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, which was established to identify and characterize possible WTC-related health effects in responders. The study found that about 28 percent of those tested had abnormal lung function tests, and 61 percent of those without previous health problems developed respiratory symptoms (12). However, it is important to note that these symptoms may be related to exposure to debris components other than asbestos.

    Although it is clear that health risks from asbestos exposure increase with heavier exposure and longer exposure time, investigators have found asbestos-related diseases in individuals with only brief exposures. Generally, those who develop asbestos-related diseases show no signs of illness for a long time after their first exposure. It can take from 10 to 40 years or more for symptoms of an asbestos-related condition to appear (2).

    There is some evidence that family members of workers heavily exposed to asbestos face an increased risk of developing mesothelioma. This risk is thought to result from exposure to asbestos fibers brought into the home on the shoes, clothing, skin, and hair of workers. To decrease these exposures, Federal law regulates work practices to limit the possibility of asbestos being brought home in this way. Some employees may be required to shower and change their clothes before they leave work, store their street clothes in a separate area of the workplace, or wash their work clothes at home separately from other clothes (2).

    Cases of mesothelioma have also been seen in individuals without occupational exposure, but who live close to asbestos mines or have been exposed to fibers carried home by family members working with asbestos (6).

  9. Asbestos was mined and used commercially in North America beginning in the late 1800s. Its use increased greatly during World War II (3, 4). Since then, asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, the building and construction industry has used it for strengthening cement and plastics as well as for insulation, roofing, fireproofing, and sound absorption. The shipbuilding industry has used asbestos to insulate boilers, steampipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses asbestos in vehicle brakeshoes and clutch pads. Asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tile; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics. In addition, asbestos has been found in vermiculite-containing consumer garden products and some talc-containing crayons.

    In the late 1970s, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) banned the use of asbestos in wallboard patching compounds and gas fireplaces because the asbestos fibers in these products could be released into the environment during use. Additionally, in 1979, manufacturers of electric hairdryers voluntarily stopped using asbestos in their products. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned all new uses of asbestos; uses established prior to 1989 are still allowed. The EPA also established regulations that require school systems to inspect for damaged asbestos and to eliminate or reduce the exposure to occupants by removing the asbestos or encasing it (2).

    In June 2000 the CPSC concluded that the risk of children’s exposure to asbestos fibers in crayons was extremely low (1). However, the U.S. manufacturers of these crayons agreed to eliminate talc from their products. In August 2000, the EPA responded to reports it received about the adverse human health effects associated with exposure to asbestos-contaminated vermiculite by conducting a series of tests to evaluate the extent of the risk. The EPA investigation concluded that the potential exposure to asbestos from some vermiculite products poses only a minimal health risk to consumers. The EPA recommended that consumers reduce the low risk associated with the occasional use of vermiculite during gardening activities by limiting the amount of dust produced during use. Specifically, the EPA suggested that consumers use vermiculite outdoors or in a well-ventilated area; keep vermiculite damp while using it; avoid bringing dust from vermiculite use into the home on clothing; and use premixed potting soil, which is less likely to generate dust.

    The regulations described above and other actions, coupled with widespread public concern about the health hazards of asbestos, have resulted in a significant annual decline in U.S. use of asbestos. Domestic consumption of asbestos amounted to about 803,000 metric tons in 1973, but it had dropped to about 2,400 metric tons by 2005 (3, 5).

  10. What are the health hazards of exposure to asbestos?

    People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems (6).

    Asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2, 3, 7, 8). Studies have shown that exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (a relatively rare cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen). Although rare, mesothelioma is the most common form of cancer associated with asbestos exposure. In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, some studies have suggested an association between asbestos exposure and gastrointestinal and colorectal cancers, as well as an elevated risk for cancers of the throat, kidney, esophagus, and gallbladder (3, 4). However, the evidence is inconclusive.

    Asbestos exposure may also increase the risk of asbestosis (a chronic lung disease that can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and permanent lung damage) and other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, including pleural plaques (changes in the membrane surrounding the lung), pleural thickening, and pleural effusions (abnormal collections of fluid between the thin layers of tissue lining the lung and the wall of the chest cavity). Although pleural plaques are not precursors to lung cancer, evidence suggests that people with pleural disease caused by asbestos exposure may be at increased risk for lung cancer (9).

  11. Who is at risk for an asbestos-related disease?

    Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.

    Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos. Health hazards from asbestos fibers have been recognized in workers exposed in shipbuilding trades, asbestos mining and milling, manufacturing of asbestos textiles and other asbestos products, insulation work in the construction and building trades, and a variety of other trades. Demolition workers, drywall removers, asbestos removal workers, firefighters, and automobile workers also may be exposed to asbestos fibers. However, recent studies do not support an increased risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma among automobile mechanics exposed to asbestos through brake repair (10). As a result of Government regulations and improved work practices, today’s workers (those without previous exposure) are likely to face smaller risks than did those exposed in the past.

    Those involved in the rescue, recovery, and cleanup at the site of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City are another group at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Because asbestos was used in the construction of the North Tower of the WTC, when the building was attacked, hundreds of tons of asbestos were released into the atmosphere. Those at greatest risk include firefighters, police officers, paramedics, construction workers, and volunteers who worked in the rubble at Ground Zero. Others at risk include residents in close proximity to the WTC towers and those who attended schools nearby. These populations will need to be followed to determine the long-term health consequences of their exposure (11).

    One study found that nearly 70 percent of WTC rescue and recovery workers suffered new or worsened respiratory symptoms while performing work at the WTC site. The study describes the results of the WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, which was established to identify and characterize possible WTC-related health effects in responders. The study found that about 28 percent of those tested had abnormal lung function tests, and 61 percent of those without previous health problems developed respiratory symptoms (12). However, it is important to note that these symptoms may be related to exposure to debris components other than asbestos.

    Although it is clear that health risks from asbestos exposure increase with heavier exposure and longer exposure time, investigators have found asbestos-related diseases in individuals with only brief exposures. Generally, those who develop asbestos-related diseases show no signs of illness for a long time after their first exposure. It can take from 10 to 40 years or more for symptoms of an asbestos-related condition to appear (2).

    There is some evidence that family members of workers heavily exposed to asbestos face an increased risk of developing mesothelioma. This risk is thought to result from exposure to asbestos fibers brought into the home on the shoes, clothing, skin, and hair of workers. To decrease these exposures, Federal law regulates work practices to limit the possibility of asbestos being brought home in this way. Some employees may be required to shower and change their clothes before they leave work, store their street clothes in a separate area of the workplace, or wash their work clothes at home separately from other clothes (2).

    Cases of mesothelioma have also been seen in individuals without occupational exposure, but who live close to asbestos mines or have been exposed to fibers carried home by family members working with asbestos (6).

  12. People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems (6).

    Asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2, 3, 7, 8). Studies have shown that exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (a relatively rare cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen). Although rare, mesothelioma is the most common form of cancer associated with asbestos exposure. In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, some studies have suggested an association between asbestos exposure and gastrointestinal and colorectal cancers, as well as an elevated risk for cancers of the throat, kidney, esophagus, and gallbladder (3, 4). However, the evidence is inconclusive.

    Asbestos exposure may also increase the risk of asbestosis (a chronic lung disease that can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and permanent lung damage) and other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, including pleural plaques (changes in the membrane surrounding the lung), pleural thickening, and pleural effusions (abnormal collections of fluid between the thin layers of tissue lining the lung and the wall of the chest cavity). Although pleural plaques are not precursors to lung cancer, evidence suggests that people with pleural disease caused by asbestos exposure may be at increased risk for lung cancer (9).

  13. Who is at risk for an asbestos-related disease?

    Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.

    Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos. Health hazards from asbestos fibers have been recognized in workers exposed in shipbuilding trades, asbestos mining and milling, manufacturing of asbestos textiles and other asbestos products, insulation work in the construction and building trades, and a variety of other trades. Demolition workers, drywall removers, asbestos removal workers, firefighters, and automobile workers also may be exposed to asbestos fibers. However, recent studies do not support an increased risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma among automobile mechanics exposed to asbestos through brake repair (10). As a result of Government regulations and improved work practices, today’s workers (those without previous exposure) are likely to face smaller risks than did those exposed in the past.

    Those involved in the rescue, recovery, and cleanup at the site of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City are another group at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Because asbestos was used in the construction of the North Tower of the WTC, when the building was attacked, hundreds of tons of asbestos were released into the atmosphere. Those at greatest risk include firefighters, police officers, paramedics, construction workers, and volunteers who worked in the rubble at Ground Zero. Others at risk include residents in close proximity to the WTC towers and those who attended schools nearby. These populations will need to be followed to determine the long-term health consequences of their exposure (11).

    One study found that nearly 70 percent of WTC rescue and recovery workers suffered new or worsened respiratory symptoms while performing work at the WTC site. The study describes the results of the WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, which was established to identify and characterize possible WTC-related health effects in responders. The study found that about 28 percent of those tested had abnormal lung function tests, and 61 percent of those without previous health problems developed respiratory symptoms (12). However, it is important to note that these symptoms may be related to exposure to debris components other than asbestos.

    Although it is clear that health risks from asbestos exposure increase with heavier exposure and longer exposure time, investigators have found asbestos-related diseases in individuals with only brief exposures. Generally, those who develop asbestos-related diseases show no signs of illness for a long time after their first exposure. It can take from 10 to 40 years or more for symptoms of an asbestos-related condition to appear (2).

    There is some evidence that family members of workers heavily exposed to asbestos face an increased risk of developing mesothelioma. This risk is thought to result from exposure to asbestos fibers brought into the home on the shoes, clothing, skin, and hair of workers. To decrease these exposures, Federal law regulates work practices to limit the possibility of asbestos being brought home in this way. Some employees may be required to shower and change their clothes before they leave work, store their street clothes in a separate area of the workplace, or wash their work clothes at home separately from other clothes (2).

    Cases of mesothelioma have also been seen in individuals without occupational exposure, but who live close to asbestos mines or have been exposed to fibers carried home by family members working with asbestos (6).

  14. Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.

    Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos. Health hazards from asbestos fibers have been recognized in workers exposed in shipbuilding trades, asbestos mining and milling, manufacturing of asbestos textiles and other asbestos products, insulation work in the construction and building trades, and a variety of other trades. Demolition workers, drywall removers, asbestos removal workers, firefighters, and automobile workers also may be exposed to asbestos fibers. However, recent studies do not support an increased risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma among automobile mechanics exposed to asbestos through brake repair (10). As a result of Government regulations and improved work practices, today’s workers (those without previous exposure) are likely to face smaller risks than did those exposed in the past.

    Those involved in the rescue, recovery, and cleanup at the site of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City are another group at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Because asbestos was used in the construction of the North Tower of the WTC, when the building was attacked, hundreds of tons of asbestos were released into the atmosphere. Those at greatest risk include firefighters, police officers, paramedics, construction workers, and volunteers who worked in the rubble at Ground Zero. Others at risk include residents in close proximity to the WTC towers and those who attended schools nearby. These populations will need to be followed to determine the long-term health consequences of their exposure (11).

    One study found that nearly 70 percent of WTC rescue and recovery workers suffered new or worsened respiratory symptoms while performing work at the WTC site. The study describes the results of the WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, which was established to identify and characterize possible WTC-related health effects in responders. The study found that about 28 percent of those tested had abnormal lung function tests, and 61 percent of those without previous health problems developed respiratory symptoms (12). However, it is important to note that these symptoms may be related to exposure to debris components other than asbestos.

    Although it is clear that health risks from asbestos exposure increase with heavier exposure and longer exposure time, investigators have found asbestos-related diseases in individuals with only brief exposures. Generally, those who develop asbestos-related diseases show no signs of illness for a long time after their first exposure. It can take from 10 to 40 years or more for symptoms of an asbestos-related condition to appear (2).

    There is some evidence that family members of workers heavily exposed to asbestos face an increased risk of developing mesothelioma. This risk is thought to result from exposure to asbestos fibers brought into the home on the shoes, clothing, skin, and hair of workers. To decrease these exposures, Federal law regulates work practices to limit the possibility of asbestos being brought home in this way. Some employees may be required to shower and change their clothes before they leave work, store their street clothes in a separate area of the workplace, or wash their work clothes at home separately from other clothes (2).

    Cases of mesothelioma have also been seen in individuals without occupational exposure, but who live close to asbestos mines or have been exposed to fibers carried home by family members working with asbestos (6).


Horizontal Divider 1

Phase 1 Enviromental Site Assessment - $495.00
                                                                  (GA Only)

A Environmental Site Assessment is a report prepared for a real estate holding which identifies potential or existing environmental contamination liabilities. The analysis, often called a ESA, typically addresses both the underlying land as well as physical improvements to the property; however, techniques applied in a Phase I ESA never include actual collection of physical samples or chemical analyses of any kind. Scrutiny of the land includes examination of potential soil contamination, groundwater quality, surface water quality and sometimes issues related to hazardous substance uptake by biota. The examination of a site may include: definition of any chemical residues within structures; identification of possible asbestos containing building materials; inventory of hazardous substances stored or used on site; assessment of mold and mildew; and evaluation of other indoor air quality parameters[1]. Contaminated sites are often referred to as "brownfield sites." In severe cases, brownfield sites may be added to the National Priorities List where they will be subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund program.

Actual sampling of soil, air, groundwater and/or building materials is typically not conducted during a Phase I ESA. The Phase I ESA is generally considered the first step in the process of environmental due diligence. This type of study is alternatively called a Level I Environmental Site Assessment. Standards for performing a Phase I site assessment have been promulgated by the US EPA[2] and are based in part on ASTM in Standard E1527-05.[3] If a site is considered contaminated, a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment may be conducted, ASTM test E1903, a more detailed investigation involving chemical analysis for hazardous substances and/or petroleum hydrocarbons.

Actions triggering the Phase I ESA

A variety of actions[8] can cause a Phase I study to be performed for a commercial property, the most common being:

  • Asbestos Containing Building Materials (ACBM)
  • Lead-Based Paint
  • Lead in Drinking Water
  • Mold
  • Radon
  • Wetlands
  • Threatened and Endangered Species
  • Earthquake Hazard
  • Vapor Intrusion
  • Purchase of real property by a person or entity not previously on title.
  • Contemplation by a new lender to provide a loan on the subject real estate.
  • Partnership buyout or principal redistribution of ownership.
  • Application to a public agency for change of use or other discretionary land use permit.
  • Existing property owner’s desire to understand toxic history of the property.
  • Compulsion by a regulatory agency who suspects toxic conditions on the site.
  • Divestiture of properties

Phase II  Environmental Site Assessment - $1995.00
                                                                  (GA Customers Only)

Phase II Environmental Site Assessment
is an investigation which collects original samples of soil, groundwater or building materials to analyze for quantitative values of various contaminants[9]. This investigation is normally undertaken when a Phase I ESA determines a likelihood of site contamination. The most frequent substances tested are
petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, pesticides, solvents, asbestos and mold.

A variety of actions[8] can cause a Phase I study to be performed for a commercial property, the most common being:

  • Asbestos Containing Building Materials (ACBM)
  • Lead-Based Paint
  • Lead in Drinking Water
  • Mold
  • Radon
  • Wetlands
  • Threatened and Endangered Species
  • Earthquake Hazard
  • Vapor Intrusion
  • Purchase of real property by a person or entity not previously on title.
  • Contemplation by a new lender to provide a loan on the subject real estate.
  • Partnership buyout or principal redistribution of ownership.
  • Application to a public agency for change of use or other discretionary land use permit.
  • Existing property owner’s desire to understand toxic history of the property.
  • Compulsion by a regulatory agency who suspects toxic conditions on the site.
  • Divestiture of properties

Phase II  Environmental Site Assessment - $1995.00
                                                                  (GA Customers Only)

Phase II Environmental Site Assessment
is an investigation which collects original samples of soil, groundwater or building materials to analyze for quantitative values of various contaminants[9]. This investigation is normally undertaken when a Phase I ESA determines a likelihood of site contamination. The most frequent substances tested are
petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, pesticides, solvents, asbestos and mold.

A variety of actions[8] can cause a Phase I study to be performed for a commercial property, the most common being:

  • Asbestos Containing Building Materials (ACBM)
  • Lead-Based Paint
  • Lead in Drinking Water
  • Mold
  • Radon
  • Wetlands
  • Threatened and Endangered Species
  • Earthquake Hazard
  • Vapor Intrusion
  • Purchase of real property by a person or entity not previously on title.
  • Contemplation by a new lender to provide a loan on the subject real estate.
  • Partnership buyout or principal redistribution of ownership.
  • Application to a public agency for change of use or other discretionary land use permit.
  • Existing property owner’s desire to understand toxic history of the property.
  • Compulsion by a regulatory agency who suspects toxic conditions on the site.
  • Divestiture of properties

Phase II  Environmental Site Assessment - $1995.00
                                                                  (GA Customers Only)

Phase II Environmental Site Assessment
is an investigation which collects original samples of soil, groundwater or building materials to analyze for quantitative values of various contaminants[9]. This investigation is normally undertaken when a Phase I ESA determines a likelihood of site contamination. The most frequent substances tested are
petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, pesticides, solvents, asbestos and mold.

A variety of actions[8] can cause a Phase I study to be performed for a commercial property, the most common being:

  • Asbestos Containing Building Materials (ACBM)
  • Lead-Based Paint
  • Lead in Drinking Water
  • Mold
  • Radon
  • Wetlands
  • Threatened and Endangered Species
  • Earthquake Hazard
  • Vapor Intrusion
  • Purchase of real property by a person or entity not previously on title.
  • Contemplation by a new lender to provide a loan on the subject real estate.
  • Partnership buyout or principal redistribution of ownership.
  • Application to a public agency for change of use or other discretionary land use permit.
  • Existing property owner’s desire to understand toxic history of the property.
  • Compulsion by a regulatory agency who suspects toxic conditions on the site.
  • Divestiture of properties

Horizontal Divider 1

Overview of Legionella 

Background
The first recognized outbreak of Legionnnaires' Disease occurred in the US at the American Legion Convention in Philadelphia during the summer of 1976. There were several hundred people who were stricken. Thirty four people died from the disease. As a result of the efforts of the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC), this was the first time the bacteria was cultured and identified. Earlier outbreaks of the disease went undiagnosed. Since that time, there have been many identified outbreaks in this country and abroad prompting professional organizations and health departments worldwide to implement guidelines for diagnosing and reporting the disease, and monitoring the organism.

Transmission and Epidemiology
Ubiquitous in all aquatic environments, Legionella bacteria are found in groundwater as well as fresh and marine surface waters. The bacteria enter our plumbing systems, whirlpool spas, and cooling towers via these water sources. Unless control measures are conducted properly and routinely, the biofilm, scale, and corrosion that builds up over time in these systems will protect the organism and allow it to multiply.

Contaminated aerosolized water from cooling towers, whirlpool baths, nebulizers, faucets, and showerheads becomes airborne. When a susceptible host inhales the contaminated aerosol, legionellosis can occur. Aspiration of the contaminated water can also cause the disease. Legionellosis can cause two types of illness: 1. a severe form of pneumonia (Legionnaires' Disease) often accompanied by serious long term health effects, and 2. a mild flu-like illness called Pontiac Fever. Other infected organs, and asymptomatic infections may also occur.

Historically, risk factors for getting the disease included age, gender, compromised immune systems, and pre-existing medical conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, and diabetes. Men over 65 years of age who were heavy smokers and drinkers were identified as being at greatest risk. While that is still true, recent research from Neil and Berkelman at Emory University has identified an abrupt increase in the incidence of Legionnaires' Disease in the US in all age groups in the last 20 years. This trend has also been noted internationally by other researchers. They have noted an overall increase in the disease among all people aged 45 to 64. Rates of disease in males still exceed the rates in females.

There also have been cases of the disease in healthy, younger people. Pre-mature, immuno-compromised, or ventilated neonates are at risk from hospital acquired infection. In addition cases have been reported in children aged 15-19 years old.

Although the disease is under-reported, travel (cruise ships), hotel, and resort related outbreaks are reported each year. These are mostly associated with the use of whirlpool spas and potable water. While community-acquired outbreaks involving cooling towers and whirlpool spas receive the most media attention, studies indicate that building potable water sources account for most of the infections. This is particularly true in hospitals and nursing homes where there are large numbers of immunosuppressed or critically ill people. For these reasons, many state health departments have guidelines that recommend routine monitoring for legionella in critical care hospitals and nursing homes. In 2008, the Veteran's Administration promulgated a directive which requires all VA hospitals and rehabilitation centers to implement monitoring for the bacteria in their potable water systems

Salmonellosis Salmonella E coli Foodborne Illnesses


What is salmonellosis?

Salmonellosis is an infection with bacteria called Salmonella, which generally affects the intestines and occasionally the bloodstream. It is one of the more common causes of diarrheal illness with an estimated several thousand cases occurring in New York State each year. Most cases occur in the summer months and can be seen as single cases, clusters or outbreaks.

Who gets salmonellosis?

Any person can get salmonellosis, but it is diagnosed more often in infants and children. Young children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised are the most likely to have severe infections.

How are Salmonella bacteria spread?

Salmonella are spread by eating or drinking contaminated food or water or by contact with infected people or animals.

What are the symptoms of salmonellosis?

People infected with Salmonella may experience mild or severe diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever and occasionally vomiting. Bloodstream infections can be quite serious, particularly in the very young or elderly.

How soon after exposure do symptoms appear?

The symptoms generally appear one to three days after contact with Salmonella bacteria.

Where are Salmonella found?

Salmonella can be found in raw or undercooked meats and eggs, unpasteurized milk and cheese products . Foods can also be contaminated by Salmonella bacteria during preparation or processing. Other exposures may include contact with infected animals, especially poultry, swine, cattle, rodents and pets, such as reptiles (iguanas, snakes, lizards and turtles), chicks, ducklings, birds, dogs and cats. Previous outbreaks of Salmonella in New York State have been associated with peanut butter, frozen pot pies, eggs, pet foods and turtles.

How long can an infected person carry Salmonella?

An infected person can carry the bacteria for a few days or several months. People who have been treated with oral antibiotics and younger people tend to carry the bacteria longer than others.

Do infected people need to be isolated or excluded from work or school?

Most infected people may return to work or school when their diarrhea has stopped. Food workers, health care personnel and children in daycare must obtain the approval from the local or state health department before returning to their normal work activities.

What is the treatment for salmonellosis?

Salmonella infections usually resolve in five to seven days and often do not require treatment unless the patient becomes severely dehydrated or the infection spreads from the intestines. Those with severe diarrhea may require rehydration, often with intravenous fluids. Antibiotics are usually not necessary unless the infection spreads from the intestines.

How can salmonellosis be prevented?

  1. Always handle raw poultry, beef and pork accordingly:
    • Wrap fresh meats in plastic bags at the market to prevent blood from dripping on other foods. Refrigerate foods promptly; minimize holding at room temperature.
    • Never place cooked food on an unwashed plate that previously held raw beef, poultry, pork, fish or seafood.
    • Cutting boards and counters used for beef, poultry, pork, fish or seafood preparation should be washed immediately after use to prevent cross contamination with other foods.
    • Avoid eating raw or undercooked meats. While the juice color will usually change from red to gray when the meat is fully cooked, it is not a reliable test to assure it is safe to eat.
    • Always check the temperature with a meat thermometer. Foods that reach the temperatures listed below or higher are fully cooked.

      FoodTemperature
      Chicken165° F
      Hamburger160° F
      Pork150° F
      Hot dogs140° F
      Leftovers165° F
      Eggs145° F
      Other foods140° F
    • To check the temperature of the meat, insert the thermometer into the center of the meat, which is the least cooked part. For checking hot dogs, go from the end of the hot dog to the center. Be careful not to pass through the meat and touch the cooking surface or you will get a false high temperature reading.
    • Further advice on food preparation and disease prevention is available at http://www.nyhealth.gov/environmental/indoors/food_safety/barbecue.htm
  2. Avoid eating raw eggs or undercooking foods containing raw eggs. Raw eggs may be unrecognized in some foods such as homemade hollandaise sauce, Caesar and other homemade salad dressings, tiramisu, homemade ice cream, homemade mayonnaise, homemade eggnog, cookie dough and frosting.
  3. Avoid drinking unpasteurized milk.
  4. Wash fruits and vegetables before eating.
  5. Encourage careful hand washing before and after food preparation.
  6. Wash hands (especially children) immediately after handling reptiles, having contact with pet feces or handling pet food or treats.
  7. Do not keep reptiles as pets in homes with immunocompromised persons or young children.

What Is E. Coli?

E. coli is a common type of bacteria that can get into food, like beef and vegetables. E. coli is short for the medical term Escherichia coli. The strange thing about these bacteria — and lots of other bacteria — is that they're not always harmful to you.
E. coli normally lives inside your intestines, where it helps your body break down and digest the food you eat. Unfortunately, certain types (called strains) of E. coli can get from the intestines into the blood. This is a rare illness, but it can cause a very serious infection.

Someone who has E. coli infection may have these symptoms:

  • bad stomach cramps and belly pain
  • vomiting
  • diarreha sometimes with blood in it

One very bad strain of E. coli was found in fresh spinach in 2006 and some fast-food hamburgers in 1993. Beef can contain E. coli because the bacteria often infect cattle. It can be in meat that comes from cattle and it's also in their poop, called manure. Cow poop in your food? How does that happen? Not on purpose, of course, but it can happen if the manure is used for fertilizer (a common practice to help crops grow) or if water contaminated with E. coli is used to irrigate the crops.

Foods to Watch

E. coli can be passed from person to person, but serious E. coli infection is more often linked to food containing the bacteria. The person eats the contaminated food and gets sick.

Here are some foods that can cause E. coli poisoning:

  • undercooked ground beef (used for hamburgers)
  • vegetables grown in cow manure or washed in contaminated water
  • fruit juice that isn't pasteurized (pasteurization is a process that uses heat to kill germs)

Heat can kill E. coli, so experts recommend that people cook beef (especially ground beef) until it is cooked through and no longer pink. Choosing pasteurized juice is another way to avoid possible infection.

Lastly, some experts recommend washing and scrubbing vegetables before eating them. But others say E. coli is hard to remove once it has contaminated produce, such as spinach, lettuce, or onions. The solution, they say, is to take more steps so that E. coli doesn't come in contact with crops.

What Will the Doctor Do?

If someone has symptoms of E. coli poisoning, the doctor will run some blood tests and take a sample of the person's stool (poop). The blood and stool can be checked to see if a harmful strain of E. coli is present. Even though diarrhea is one of the main symptoms, the person shouldn't take anti-diarrhea medicines because they can slow down recovery time.

Some people recover at home, while others need to be in the hospital. In some cases, E. coli poisoning can cause life-threatening kidney problems.

What Can Kids Do?

Adults are the main people in charge of preventing E. coli infection by serving well-cooked meat, cleaning countertops when preparing meats, and being aware of any recalls affecting contaminated vegetables or other products.

But kids can help, too. Here are three ways:

  1. When you're at a restaurant, order your burger well done. Eat it only if it's brown, not pink, on the inside.
  2. Don't swallow lake, ocean, or pool water. If the water contains any human waste, it can carry the E. coli bacteria.
  3. Always wash your hands after you use the bathroom and before you eat. There are plenty of bacteria in your poop. Gross! You don't want to accidentally eat some of those bad bacteria!

Serving all of Georgia including:

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Asbestos Inspection and Testing call: 
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 Atlanta Stucco Repair Contractor Listing
 
Quality Home Improvements - Mr. Ross Jurca
www.qualitystuccorepairs.com (404) 259-4565 

Craftmaster Enterprises - Mr. Shay Ricketts 
www.craftmasterenterprises.com  (678) 445-7966
                                                          (770) 480-5764

Quality Synthetic Stucco - Mr. Tim Sims
                                            (770) 974-0276

Unlimited Exteriors - Mr. Randy James
 www.mygeorgiarepairman.com   (770) 356-5174
                                                            (678) 715-7668

Burd Stucco - Mr. Glen Burd
                      (770) 572-8834 
                      (770) 443-5696


This site is dedicated to the memory of my loving father Charles Zaeske and all WWII veterans. I will not forget what you have done for all of us free Americans and all our troops around the world God bless and keep you safe.






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